Tag Archives: Gender

Gender and Space in Rural Britain, 1840-1940

This one has been a bit quiet for a while as I’ve been busy with a couple of other publications since, but my first edited collection Gender and Space in Rural Britain, 1840-1940 which I co-edited with Dr Gemma Goodman (Warwick), is now available in paperback for £34 from Routledge.

The collection was generously reviewed earlier this year by Josephine McDonagh in Victorian Studies 58.2 (pp. 383-385).

At a glance, the contents are as follows:

Introduction: Gender and Space in Rural Britain, 1840-1920, Gemma Goodman and Charlotte Mathieson

  1. ‘Women in the Field’, Roger Ebbatson
  2. ‘Between two civilizations”: George Sturt’s constructions of loss and change in village life’, Barry Sloan
  3. ‘At Work and at Play: Charles Lee’s Cynthia in the West’, Gemma Goodman
  4. ‘“Going out, Going Alone”: Modern Subjectivities in Rural Scotland, 1900-1921’, Samantha Walton
  5. ‘“Drowned Lands”: Charles Kingsley’s Hereward the Wake and the Masculation of the English Fens’, Lynsey McCulloch
  6. ‘“Wandering like a wild thing”: Rurality, Women and Walking in George Eliot’s Adam Bede and The Mill on the Floss’, Charlotte Mathieson
  7. ‘“I never liked long walks”: Gender, Nature, and Jane Eyre’s Rural Wandering’, Katherine F. Montgomery
  8. ‘Gertrude Jekyll: Cultivating the Gendered Space of the Victorian Garden for Professional Success’. Exploring the work of Gertude Jekyll (1843-1932)’ Christen Ericsson-Penfold
  9. ‘From England to Eden; Gardens, Gender and Knowledge in Virginia Woolf’s The Voyage Out’, Karina Jakubowicz
  10. ‘The Transnational Rural in Alicia Little’s My Diary in a Chinese Farm’, Eliza S. K. Leong
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Publication: “A brown sunburnt gentleman”: Masculinity and the Travelling Body in Dickens’s Bleak House

My article “A brown sunburnt gentleman”: Masculinity and the Travelling Body in Dickens’s Bleak House is now available online in the new issue of Nineteenth-Century Contexts (36.4) – a special issue on the Male Body in Victorian Literature and Culture, edited by Nadine Muller and Jo Parsons.

Coastal Cultures of the Long Nineteenth Century, University of Oxford 14th March 2014

Back in January I posted about the Sea Narratives symposium held at Warwick as part of the Travel and Mobility Studies Network, and since then I seem to have been coming across sea research in all sorts of places – one being that we have Christine Riding from the National Maritime Museum talking about Turner and the Sea at BookFest in May. I’ve also started putting together an edited collection based on the sea narratives symposium, and have begun developing some of my own work along this theme. Coastal Cultures of the Long Nineteenth Century was a welcome opportunity to hone in on the resonances of the sea in this particular period, and especially to think about the cultures and communities that forge at the meeting of land and sea.

Continue reading Coastal Cultures of the Long Nineteenth Century, University of Oxford 14th March 2014

Victorian Masculinities: MIVSS at Uni of Nottingham, 16th January

The latest meeting of the Midlands Interdisciplinary Victorian Studies Seminar, at the University of Nottingham on 16th January, explored the theme of Victorian Masculinities. Holly Furneaux’s (University of Leicester) keynote on gender and care in the Crimean War started the day, seeking to overturn the narrow popular and academic focus on Florence Nightingale’s role in the Crimean War to look at the work of male solider orderlies on military wards. Through a range of diaries and accounts of the war, Furneaux presented a fascinating and complex picture of the gendering of solider orderlies: forging emotional connections with one another, performing physical acts of care, and undertaking typically feminine arts of embroidery and quilting, all contributed to a vital reassessment of military masculinity.

“Nightingale receiving the Wounded at Scutari”, by Jerry Barrett, 1856
“Nightingale receiving the Wounded at Scutari”, by Jerry Barrett, 1856

Continue reading Victorian Masculinities: MIVSS at Uni of Nottingham, 16th January

‘A sea of stories’: Sea Narratives Symposium at Warwick, 24th January

Where are your monuments, your battles, martyrs?

Where is your tribal memory? Sirs,

in that gray vault. The sea. The sea

has locked them up. The sea is History.

Fishermen at Sea, by JMW Turner, 1796
Fishermen at Sea, by JMW Turner, 1796

Derek Walcott’s poem “The Sea is History” was one of our starting points for the symposium on Sea Narratives organised as part of the Travel and Mobility Studies Network at Warwick. When we formed the idea for this symposium, we hoped to create an interdisciplinary forum that would generate multiple and intersecting perspectives on the rich histories, geographies, and narratives of the sea. We were certainly not disappointed, and the 6 speakers that presented throughout the day provided a fascinating array of insights into the places, practices, and politics that shape the sea.

Continue reading ‘A sea of stories’: Sea Narratives Symposium at Warwick, 24th January

George Eliot: guest post on the FWSA blog

George Eliot 2The Feminist and Women’s Studies Association blog recently started an exciting series on historical groundbreaking women, showcasing the life and work of some fascinating and lesser-known figures, and I’m very pleased to have contributed a post on George Eliot. Although Eliot is well known, I’ve tried to offer some thoughts on the complexities of her ‘groundbreaking’ life and work, and to draw out some smaller examples from her fiction that might not be so widely recognised.

And if you haven’t done so already, do go and check out the rest of the series, and indeed the whole blog which is full of excellent feminist content!