New publication: Brontë Countries – the literary landscapes of Haworth and Brussels

Having posted already about a new Charlotte Brontë publication at the start of July, the month finished with a second: a chapter in this new book, Charlotte Brontë: Legacies and Afterlives, edited by Amber K. Regis and Deborah Wynne and published by Manchester University Press. The book traces Charlotte Brontë’s legacies from the time she was writing to the present day and I’m delighted to have my work included among a fantastic set of contributors.

My chapter, titled “Brontë countries: nation, gender and place in the literary landscapes of Haworth and Brussels”, looks at how these two locations developed distinctly different Brontë afterlives in the 19th century and beyond. Haworth is familiar to many as a key Brontë location, and the Yorkshire landscape of “Brontë country” is central to the enduring cultural myth of the Brontës. Even before Charlotte Brontë’s death in 1855, intrigued readers had begun to visit the Parsonage, and the publication of Elizabeth Gaskell’s Life of Charlotte Brontë in 1857 instigated a steady stream of visitors that has continued to the present day, generating a significant tourist industry at Haworth.

Brussels also holds an important place in Brontë’s work (as my last article explores, it afforded Brontë new opportunities for urban wandering that shape her novel Villette) and while on a much smaller scale, generations of readers have gone in search of another “Brontë country” to be traced in the city’s streets (as I have too – I blogged a photo-essay of Brontë’s Brussels here, and reflected on “Finding Brontë in Brussels” here).

An unofficial commemorative plaque in the Rue Terarken, Brussels
An unofficial commemorative plaque in the Rue Terarken, Brussels

In this essay for Charlotte Brontë: Legacies and Afterlives I explore the history of literary tourism in Brussels, focusing particularly on late-nineteenth century accounts. I look at how the unofficial and less scripted nature of Brussels literary tourism – tourists typically make their own way through the streets, a copy of Villette in hand serving as guidebook – allows instead for alternative narratives of Charlotte Brontë to plotted into the cityscape, narratives which especially emphasise connections between gender, identity and place. I suggest that at the moment of her bicentenary, these narratives offer an important complement and counterpart to the dominant cultural image of Brontë as she is associated with Haworth and the Yorkshire landscape, and offer new perspectives from which to consider her works and their afterlives.

 

 

Balancing acts: priorities, strategies, challenges of ECR careers

I spoke at the TECHNE doctoral congress on the subject of the “balancing acts” required early career researchers as you start on academic career paths. The slides from my talk are here, and I also wanted to signpost a few other blog posts where I’ve written more fully about some of these issues, and direct you to some related resources on other websites.

What does an early career path look like? my route from PhD to permanent job.

Balancing acts – some of the issues covered in this talk were the topic of a talk I gave at a discussion day on ECAs in English last year.

Developing a publication strategy as an ECR (note: some of this is now out of date, with changes anticipated for the next REF; these should become clearer in late July, when I will be blogging further about this). The ECR hub on Palgrave Macmillan’s site and Wiley’s author resources are a useful starting point for understanding the publishing process. PhD2Published is an amazing haven of resources on writing and Pat Thomson has a lot of brilliant advice on publishing including this post on turning your thesis into a book.

Teaching – some great resources on the Royal Historical Society ECR pages (obviously aimed at historians, but more widely applicable).

Digital identity – my colleague Allan Johnson gave an excellent talk about social media as an academic, and I spoke a bit about my experience of this in the questions. I’ve written about this here and have lots of related resources compiled here. For online communities, #phdchat and #ecrchat are great hubs for careers discussion, and for Arts students, @wethehumanities is a brilliant place to start networking with other arts researchers, whether you’re new to twitter or an old hand.

The subject of ECR wellbeing came up in one of the discussion sessions; I recently spoke about this and slides are available here, full post coming soon. I’d recommend the excellent academia and mental health resources on Nadine Muller’s blog.

 

The Voice of the Academic – a one-day workshop for TECHNE PhD students

I am delighted to be running this workshop for PhD students, thanks to funding from the TECHNE Training and Development fund. Full details of the day and information on how to sign up are below (places are limited and going fast!).

The voice of the academic: vocal training for academic success

A one-day workshop for PhD students

22nd September 2017, University of Surrey

The use of the voice is crucial to academic work: whether it is in teaching, giving talks, broadcast and media work, or in job interviews, a large proportion of an academic career depends upon public speaking. Training in using the voice effectively will enable you to make the most of your academic expertise in the public-facing scenarios which count towards your career.

This one-day event teaches you vocal and presentation techniques, and gives you practice in applying them in a job interview scenario. In the morning you will participate in two workshops that focus on improving the use of the voice, practicing the Alexander Technique to relieve tension in the body and make full use of the breath, and working with a vocal practitioner to learn about the effective use of the voice. In the afternoon you will put these skills into practice in an academic job interview workshop, learning more about what is expected at an academic interview and giving a 3-5 minute “job pitch” talk making use of the techniques you have learned.

By the end of the day you will have gained practical skills in vocal technique, built up your confidence in public speaking, and understand how to prepare for academic interviews. We will conclude by discussing self-reflective techniques and give you a resource pack to help you to continue working on these skills after the workshop.

To attend this workshop

The event is open to doctoral students affiliated to TECHNE institutions, with priority given to TECHNE funded PhD students.

To register for a place please complete the booking form by 8th September.

Due to the participative nature of this workshop places are limited to 20 students. A waiting list will be created from additional registrations; please inform the organisers if you are no longer able to attend so that we can release your place to someone else.

Attendees will be asked to prepare a short (3-5 minute) talk about your research in advance, to be used for the afternoon workshop; further details will be emailed to participants closer to the date.

Enquiries can be directed to Dr Charlotte Mathieson at c.mathieson@surrey.ac.uk

***

Programme

10am: Introduction

A short introduction to the day and what you hope to get from the sessions.

10.15-11am: Alexander Technique workshop

The Alexander Technique teaches how to relieve tension in the body and use muscles correctly to allow for improved posture and full use of the breath when speaking. This session with a practitioner from the Reve Pavilion in Guildford will give you some basic techniques to prepare your body for good vocal techniques.

 11-11.15am: break

 11.15-1.15pm: Vocal workshop with Guildford School of Acting

In this session students will learn about care of the voice, and develop techniques for effective speaking with Chris Palmer, Head of Voice at Guildford School of Acting. Chris Palmer works with University academic staff and PhD students on voice projection, accent softening (elocution), breath support, articulation, volume and clarity and preparation of presentations.

 

1.15-2pm: Lunch (provided)

 

2-4.15pm: Academic job interview workshop, led by Dr Allan Johnson and Dr Charlotte Mathieson

In this session we will put into practice the techniques you have learned in a workshop focused on academic job interviews. We will begin with a discussion about what to expect from an academic job interview, led by the workshop leaders who have extensive experience and training expertise in this area. Participants will then be split into two groups to give a short “job pitch” talk (3-5 minutes) to their group, receiving supportive and constructive feedback focused on vocal and presentation skills. In the concluding discussion, we will give you some top tips for interview preparation, including sample questions to prepare.

 4.15-4.30pm: Closing discussion: Reflective techniques for future success

The day will conclude with suggestions for self-reflective techniques and provide you with a resource pack to help you to continue improving your skills after the workshop.

 

Interview: the FWSA virtual conference

I was interviewed by Jade French of Not So Popular on the FWSA virtual conference that we are running this year. I spoke about some of the difficulties of in-person conferences to individuals, the constraints that a traditional 20-minute paper can impose, and how the virtual conference seeks to redress some of these issues. The interview is here – thanks Jade for some great questions!

New publication: Walking the City in Charlotte Brontë’s Villette, Journal of Victorian Culture

My article “‘A still ecstasy of freedom and enjoyment’: Walking the city in Charlotte Brontë’s Villette” has been published online  in the Journal of Victorian Culture. In this piece, I suggest that Brontë’s writing of women’s city walking makes a significant contribution to the idea of the flâneuse. Through a reading of Brontë’s letters from Belgium and her 1853 novel Villette, I argue that Brontë writes herself and Lucy Snowe into a growing canon of strolling city women, and that she brings a new perspective to the construct of the flâneuse through an embodied articulation of urban city wandering.

I start by looking at the prevalence of travel in Brontë’s letters, locating her within a new wave of women on the move in the mid-nineteenth century. There is a competing tension between the desire for mobility – “such a strong wish for wings” – and the reality of containment within the home, that runs through her letters, and this goes on to shape her fictional writing.* I then turn to her letters from Belgium: the city afforded Brontë new opportunities for “threading the streets”, and she starts to develop an attentiveness to the relationship between body, mobility and space that is developed more substantially in Lucy Snowe’s city encounter in Villette. Here, the thrill of city walking – “a still ecstasy of freedom and enjoyment” – emerges as an acutely embodied experience, and I argue that through this Brontë carves out a new discursive space for her woman walker, shifting from the spectatorship of the flâneur to a more fully sensory experience of the urban environment. This becomes crucial to the strong sense of autonomy and agency that walking affords women; at the same time, Brontë recognises the difficulties of mobility for women, and in the final section I look at how she negotiates this tension through highly embodied accounts of Lucy’s wandering in later sections of Villette.

* I explore this trait in Jane Eyre in my book.

 

Writing a Transport History of the Great Exhibition III: Transporting Goods

In this series of posts I am writing about my initial work on the transport history of the Great Exhibition that I presented last year at a workshop of the York Transport Historians. In the first post I wrote about how this project came about, and part II discussed the planning stages of the Exhibition. In this third post, I look at how goods moved across the world into the Crystal Palace.

III. Transporting Goods to the Exhibition

crystalpalace_victorians109-wl_0
The Great Exhibition of 1851; see The British Library images

“It seemed as if magic only could have gathered this mass of wealth from all the ends of the Earth – as if none but supernatural hands could have arranged it thus… ruled and subdued by some invisible influence”

Charlotte Brontë, in a letter of 7th June 1851 to her father, Patrick Brontë

Such were Charlotte Brontë’s words upon entering the Crystal Palace in June 1851, the first of 2 visits that she made during her stay in London that year. Her reflections here capture the extraordinary co-ordination of forces that had come together to produce what another contemporary commentator described as a “monument to consumption” (Nikolas Pevsner, 1851).

While evocative, Brontë’s invocation of “the invisible influence” of supernatural hands belies the very visible presence of activity in the lead-up to the Exhibition; whether in the streets of London or in the pages of the press, objects on the move were recorded with intense fascination in the months and weeks leading up to the Exhibition.*

This started with the international packages, sometimes traced right from the point of origin; in one case, the route of a “monster lump of zinc ore” sent from the USA is followed from the mines, over the mountains to Dover, New Jersey, and then on to the coast to be shipped across the Atlantic (see The Times, 16th January 1851, p. 6).

Much of the sea-transportation was undertaken by the steamer ships that had largely outmoded sailing vessels by this point in the century, and Britain’s global network of steamships came into action: the Peninsular & Oriental company shipped items from Middle East and Mediterranean, the East India Company brought goods from India, and regular services between Britain and many ports across Europe served the continental contributors. Some ships were of especial interest, such as the Feiza Baari, the first Turkish steam-ship to ever visit England. The US frigate St Lawrence was also the subject of much anticipation, and for several months there are reports detailing the choice of ship, its fitting up, and then the awaiting of its eventual arrival on British shores, greeted with much excitement:

Picture1ship
The Times, 14th March 1851, p. 5

While the St Lawrence was of particular interest for the eagerly-awaited American contribution to the Exhibition, the attention given here to the packages it contains is not unusual. In the months leading up to the opening, the pages of The Times are filled with numerous such reports recording each arrival at the British docks with meticulous detailing of the number, and often the contents, of packages brought by each ship. As the weeks progress, this turns into something of a growing fixation at the numbers of goods received and the number still to arrive, as in this table from 22nd April 1851 recording the “return of foreign and colonial goods received to April 19 (inclusive):

Picture1goods
The Times, 22nd April 1851, p. 3

 

Such figures are accompanied by frequent expressions of anxiety at the unknown quantities of goods still to be received, and concerns about scant intelligence from some countries: in February The Times writes, “the Executive Committee remain in profound ignorance as to what they may expect from most of the foreign countries” (The Times, 13th February 1851, p. 5) and this anxiety increases as 1st May approaches. Such concerns are a reminder that while it is easy to emphasise the global connectedness that the Exhibition depended upon, it also brought to the fore the realities of disconnection and the persistence of gaps in the networked world.

International goods arrived into either the London Docks, or to other ports such as Southampton (as in the case of the St Lawrence, above), which were connected to London by rail; many of Britain’s contributions also arrived on the railways (hence the importance of the Exhibition’s proximity to mainline stations, as outlined in this previous post). Upon arrival into the city, packages then made their way to the Crystal Palace by road.

Picture122
“The Shilling Day: Going to the Exhibition”, Illustrated London News, 19th July 1851, p. 100

Road-congestion around Hyde Park had been the subject of much discussion in the planning stages, but as the Exhibition approached this turned from concern to a source of wonder. The sight of waggons laden with goods arriving and departing at every hour becomes a spectacle in and of itself, one that The Times comments on frequently, and at length:

“waggons laden with every species of commodity have deposited their burdens in the interior… the string of conveyances in waiting often extended down the Kensington-road as far as the end of Sloane-street. Such a spectacle was probably never witnessed in any thoroughfare of the metropolis before, and passers-by stopped to gaze at that long procession … more wonderful in its character than even the rows of splendid equipages assembled in the adjoining park during the height of the season. On Monday 600 waggon loads were received; yet the whole of this vast consignment was deposited with the utmost regularity, and without any inconvenience to the ordinary traffic of the thoroughfare.”

(The Times, 3rd April 1851, p. 5)

This wonder is not only at the number of things, but also at the movement of things: the  “utmost regularity” by which so many packages are moved with order and precision. This sense of the ceaseless, repeated mass movement of items through the streets is evocative of technologized motion; while the waggons are an old form of pre-industrial transport, the consciousness of the railway age here turns them into the mechanisms of a machine-like motion filling London’s streets.

By May 1st 1851, most of the items for display had arrived in the Exhibition – with a few notable omissions, such as “the contributions of native produce from Western Australia, including the newly discovered woods from Shark’s-bay […] which were delayed by an accident to the vessel they were shipped in” (The Times, 8th May 08, 1851; pg. 6). But while a few late announcements of displays follow, attention now mostly turned to passenger transport which will be the subject of my next post.

*my focus here, as in previous posts, is on The Times; I’m currently working through local and regional newspapers to compare with and complement the London focus.

Transport & Mobility History Seminar – Summer Programme

The Transport & Mobility History Seminar at the Institute of Historical Research, London, starts again for summer term this Thursday, 27th April. Nicola Kirkby (King’s College London) is giving a paper titled “End of the line: Mental mobility in Howards End”. The seminar starts at 5.30pm, and is in N304, 3rd floor, IHR, North block, Senate House (n.b. slight change of room from last term).

The remaining two dates of the summer programme are:

25th May: James Fowler (University of York): “Who Shall Guard the Guards? – London Transport Governance 1905-33″

22nd June: Meet the Transport Archivists: confirmed speakers are Tamara Thornhill (Corporate Archivist, Transport for London) and Faye McLeod (Archivist for Jaguar Heritage Trust Archive, British Motor Museum); final speaker tbc.

The seminar is convened by David Turner (York), Tamara Thornhill (Transport for London), Christopher Phillips (Leeds), Charlotte Mathieson, (Surrey), Oliver Betts (National Railway Museum), Mike Esbester (University of Portsmouth). Details of the seminar can also be found here.

Website of Dr Charlotte Mathieson

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