Dickens’s dark London

Following on from my previous musings on Dickens 2012 and literary tourism, this new app takes the literary tour to a new level: an interactive map of Dickens’s “dark London” which promises to “take users on a journey through the darker side of Charles Dickens’ London”. In light of my previous post, this suggested some similar questions about the literary tourism and the mapping of represented/historical spaces onto contemporary “real” spaces. By virtue of its nature, though, an ipad app removes what I previously perceived as a crucial component of the literary tour: its opportunity for a mobile experience of history and the author.

I was intrigued, then, as to what the app would deliver; and the answer is, not an awful lot. The basis of the app is an interactive map of London, in which an 1862 map is overlaid onto a contemporary satellite image; a sliding bar at the bottom of the page allows you to move gradually from one to the other, along with the usual touch-screen navigation and zoom tools around both of the maps. For someone who loves maps, it’s nice to have an 1862 city map to hand (although the app as a whole is frustratingly ill-referenced so I’m not sre which map edition this is based on) and the sliding time-scale is neatly done, although of limited use after a few goes.

map

The map screen contains links to the “editions” that are being released every month – graphic novels that incorporate excerpts from Dickens’s writing, primarily Sketches by Boz as well as some of the novels such as Bleak House in this first edition, illustrated and with an accompanying narration. There are also “hotspots” which offer more contextual information on some pages. The emphasis in the content, as I suspect will be the case in subsequent editions, is on excerpts detailing the streets of London, whilst accompanying images on each page attempt to “bring to life” the written descriptions:

from the irregular square into which he has plunged, the streets and courts dart in all directions, until they are lost in the unwholesome vapour which hangs over the house-tops, and renders the dirty perspective uncertain and confined”

rooftops

Except here the app not so much falls flat, as simply undoes itself; because Dickens’s descriptions of the streets speak for themselves, or rather say more than any image, map, or accompanying historical fact can offer. It doesn’t take anything else to breathe life into the written word, and placing the text in this context ultimately only serves to highlight that, really, the accompanying paraphenelia is redundant: ultimately, it’s the written word that stands out most strongly here. Not only that, but this all detracts from the complexity and meaning that lies in Dickens’s representations of the city, reducing the idea of “Dickens’s London” to a single meaning and suggesting that these excerpts are little more than historical fact that we read for the truths they tell us about the Victorian streets.

As with the literary tour, this resides in a fundamental misreading of the relationship between real and literary spaces, but positions this within a wider framework of misreading the relationship between literature and history/ text and culture.

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